A lot of small business owners have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. On the one hand, you probably miss the days before social media when things were simpler. On the other hand, Facebook allows you to easily reach potential and existing clients with a click of the button. It’s something that you can’t afford to ignore, particularly when you consider that 78% of consumers’ purchasing decisions are impacted by the posts made by businesses they follow on social media (source: Market Force).

It’s not enough to simply have a Facebook Business page. Your posts have to captivate and motivate to inspire engagement, solidify positive brand visibility, and ultimately help to secure purchases.

Here are some suggestions on what to write on Facebook:

 


 

1. A Question

 

 

173263076Strike up a conversation by asking a straightforward question that is relevant to your business. For example, if you’re a landscaper, you might post, “Lawn gnomes – yay or nay?” Often these kinds of questions engage visitors because they can answer in one word.

You might also try questions that start a full-fledged conversation, such as “What lawn decorations, if any, are you planning to put out for the holidays?” Of course, you should “like” and respond when appropriate. The last thing you want is for a potential customer to feel ignored. The responses could also help you better understand the needs of your clients and give you the opportunity to offer tips.

 


 

2. Seasonal Content

 

Obviously, this holiday lawn display question would seem out of place in July. When you can, you should anticipate what is on the minds of Facebook visitors. Around the holidays, you can bet people will be looking for ways to spruce up their home for guests.104297711 In the summer, they might be desperately seeking info on staying cool, say with an air conditioning unit. And the start of a new year is a great time for any type of service that helps people get their affairs in order as they focus on the year ahead. For instance, a lawyer might offer tips for estate planning come January 1st.

 


 

3. Links to Practical Content

 

Just as important as seasonal content is practical articles that offer up tips and advice. Be sure to pique visitors’ interest with punchy headlines, provocative lines from the material, or something that will have them trying to figure out the answer. For instance, HVAC small business owners could post a story about the three air conditioning mistakes and write, “If you’re doing No. 3, then you could be causing damage to your property.” People will wonder what it is and if they’re doing it.

 


 

4. Quirky Facts and Statistics

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Facebook is a happy distraction for many. An interesting and unexpected tidbit has universal appeal. A plumber, for example, might share how much water is wasted in a year on a count of leaky faucets. A lawyer could post a stat about the number of people who pass away without a will and what that usually means for their families. Something like that could really get people to take action.

 


 

5. Events and News 

 

Use Facebook to invite visitors to events you’re hosting and also to share any particularly significant updates about your business. Just make sure not to overdo it with posts about how great your business is otherwise people may start seeing you as a spammer. The best kind of content can often be customer reviews that provide a different perspective on your business or photos that represent an interesting story for visitors to your Facebook page.

 


 

6. Promotions

 

Another great way to leverage Facebook is to promote discounts you’re about to offer. This can be particularly helpful if you’re going through a slow time. People are always excited to get a bargain, whether it’s a free initial consultation or a mark down on the price that you typically charge.

 


 

7. Positive Positivity

 

Many a curmudgeon says his piece on the Internet. Most people are turned off when he does. So, keep your messages positive. In other words, the glass is always half full. Coming on Facebook to complain that customers get on your nerves or even that you’re feeling blue will get you nowhere. An occasional “Is it Friday yet?” might win over a few people who will relate to the working man in you, but other than that you should stay upbeat. The world is all lollipops and roses and you’re one of its distributors – at least for the sake of your Facebook page.178742843